Seminars 2016

The next seminar will be held February 8, 2016. Please see below for details.

Departmental Awards Seminar

Date/Time: April 25, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: John Paxton, Dept. Computer Science, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Deep Learning with Partitioned Restricted Boltzmann Machines

Date/Time: April 18, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Hasari Tosun, Dept. Computer Science, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Using Machine Learning to Detect Distant Evolutionary Relationships between Protein Families

Date/Time: April 11, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Mensur Dlakic, Dept. Microbiology & Immunology, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Detecting and Tracking Communities in Social Networks Based on Campaign Contributions

Date/Time: April 4, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Scott Wahl, Dept. Computer Science, MSU

Abstract: TBA


To Be Announced

Date/Time: March 28, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Kaveh Dehghanpour, Dept. Electrical & Computer Engineering, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Sonification of GPS

Date/Time: March 21, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Linda Antas, School of Music (Music Technology), MSU

Abstract: TBA


To Be Announced

Date/Time: March 7, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Mark Greenwood, Dept. Mathematical Sciences, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Narrative Cognition and Cultural Networks: How Groups Inform Campaign Finance Reform Preferences

Date/Time: February 29, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Elizabeth Shanahan (with Michael D. Jones), Dept. Political Science, MSU

Abstract: The Narrative Policy Framework (NPF) posits narrative as a fundamental driver of policy change, policy outcomes, and policy processes, and while the NPF has made considerable inroads in helping explain narrative’s role in shaping these important public policy dependent variables (Jones & McBeth, 2010; Shanahan, Jones, & McBeth, 2011; Shanahan, Jones, McBeth, and Lane 2013; McBeth, Jones, and Shanahan 2015; Jones, Shanahan, McBeth 2015), there is still a considerable amount to be learned about the processes by which policy narratives are formed. The research presented here aims to speak to this gap in our knowledge by exploring the formative organic processes whereby information is shaped by story. To accomplish this task we analyze the narratives emerging from our focus groups. Each focus group was designed specifically to be both culturally homogeneous and culturally distinct from the other groups. Each group was also presented with an information packet about the low salience and low information issue of campaign finance reform and then given the opportunity to discuss the information and issue more generally. Given that the group was prescreened for interest in campaign finance, but also knew relatively little about the information presented to them, we hypothesized that each group would use narratives to make sense of the campaign finance information. Two researchers coded the focus group transcripts. The coding was conducted in a line-by-line analysis, with reliability tests for each coded item (Table 1). The coders achieved an acceptable level of reliability for each coding category.  The coders coded for presence-absence (0 or 1) for each category by paragraph. The coding results were analyzed in two ways to understand narrative differences. First, a network analysis was conducted to understand the centrality of the uses of the narrative coding. Second, ANOVAs were conducted to understand statistical differences in uses of narrative components by focus groups. Taken together, the results illuminate how the focus groups constructed their narratives surrounding new information on campaign finance. Our hypothesis was confirmed. Indeed, each group—presented with the same information—formed a culturally specific policy narrative distinct from the other groups related to campaign finance reform.


To Be Announced

Date/Time: February 22, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Sara Mannheimer, University Libraries, MSU

Abstract: TBA


Secure Knowledge Management

Date/Time: February 8, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Dalal Alharthi

Abstract: Knowledge has become one of the most important driving forces for organizational success. Organizations are becoming more knowledge intensive. Therefore, taking care of knowledge is important for every organization nowadays. Knowledge must be managed. Knowledge management (KM) seeks to increase organizational capability to use knowledge as a source of competitive advantage. The challenge for organizations is to develop effective strategies for managing the knowledge.

Security of Information is a major concern for organizations nowadays. Secure knowledge management is one of the emerging areas in knowledge management and information system. It refers to the management of knowledge while adhering to principles of security and privacy. As KM has become a more central part of organizational activities, securing organizational knowledge has become one of the most important issues in the KM field. Knowledge needs to be protected so that it is properly secured from threats. Knowledge security addresses the protection of knowledge in organizations.

In this presentation, I will deal with knowledge management and knowledge security. I will try to explore different approaches used to secure knowledge management. Then, I will seek to identify a number of challenging security issues in Knowledge Management associated with protecting knowledge. Finally, I will illustrate the application of knowledge management and security by providing some examples from the national government of Saudi Arabia.


Establishing a Prospective, Long-term Follow-up, Pilot Study of Mental Health Biosignatures

Date/Time: January 25, 2016 from 4:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: EPS 108

Presenter: Matt Byerly, MD, Center for Mental Health Research and Recovery

Abstract: Mental illness affects 25% of the US population each year, 6% having serious mental illness.  It also strikes the young, with 50% developing illness by age 14 and 75% by age 24, making these illnesses the most disabling disorders before age 50, and most costly of all health conditions world-wide, with estimated annual US costs of more than $300 billion.  Montana has especially significant mental health challenges including the highest suicide rate in the country, at nearly twice the national rate; large populations at high risk of mental illness including Native Americans and military veterans, and; rural settings with limited mental health treatment resources.

The new MSU Center for Mental Health Research and Recover (CMHRR) is in the process of developing a prospective, long-term follow-up, pilot study of mental health biosignatures.  A biosignature, commonly used in multiple areas of medicine, is a unique combination of measureable, biologic features of a person and their illness that aids in making a diagnosis. To date, biosignatures are not used in the routine diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.  This research will determine if we can match biologically-based diagnoses with response to specific treatments.  The result would be diagnostic “biosignatures” for individual patients that could identify their best initial treatment choice, speeding up recovery for each person with mental illness.  The work would also further identify brain signatures of illness development and progression that could aid in early and accurate diagnosis and, in turn, guide the focus of intensive preventive interventions for those at especially high risk.

Dr. Byerly, Director of the CMHRR, will discuss the background of biosignature work in mental illnesses, review the proposed study, and discuss potential relevance of the work to the computer sciences.


 

Seminars from 2015.